Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘climate’

divest from fossil fuelsThis year, thousands of people around the world made Mother Earth their Valentine by celebrating the first annual Global Divestment Day. On February 13 and 14, people banded together to ask their schools, institutions, and local governments to break up with Big Oil, sending a clear message throughout the globe that it is no longer morally, politically, nor financially acceptable to support companies that profit from the destruction of our home sweet home called Earth.

The argument for divestment is pretty simple. About  two-thirds of the reserves in the ground must stay there to keep climate change at bay, but the oil, mining, and coal companies base their financial projections on burning it all up. This is just not feasible, as burning all existing reserves has the potential to ruin the planet as we know it, at which point the economy would fall apart.

But can divestment really work, and is it a sound financial move?

dinosaur divest imageindex

Keep it in the ground!

Most academics and analysts agree that divestment of schools and public institutions will not itself weaken the capital of fossil fuels. If by divesting you sell your stock to the next investor, capital is just changing hands. However, divestment is not just about the money — it starts climate conversations where there were none before, and sets the tone for what is morally and socially acceptable in our communities. Historically, divestment from Big Tobacco and divestment from companies during the South African Apartheid were extremely successful in shaping public discourse and making big changes.

It’s abundantly clear that burning the fossil fuel reserves in the ground will totally devastate the planet upon which the economy is based. There is no cost for fossil fuels that can make up for the future loss of natural capital: the price of losing our agricultural land, the damage to ecosystems worldwide, or the health of the population. By divesting now, we stand a chance to diminish the costs that future generations will have to pay, and can fuel the movement towards a cleaner planet today.

In every era, we know that industry and progress follow the money, and the case for divestment has recently gotten stronger with the sharp decline in worldwide oil prices. To top it off, the environmental and human costs of new modes of fossil fuel extraction like fracking are making fossil fuels a less promising investment than in decades past. And the nail in the coffin of fossil fuel investment? The cost of renewables like solar is decreasing each year, and the job market for renewables is seeing a steady increase. In a study done by the banking firm Lazard, solar energy is roughly 5.6 cents a kilowatt-hour and wind is as low as 1.4, whereas natural gas and coal come in around is 6.1 and 6.6 respectively. Any smart investor can see where the future fortune lies.

But perhaps the best argument to convince our cities, schools and communities to divest is that it makes great financial sense. Reports show that in the past five years, funds divested from fossil fuels have outperformed the conventional funds. In fact, Business Spectator says that a divestment strategy “can make perfect financial sense. The fossil fuel free index also showed less volatility than the conventional [funds].” So, better returns on investment, less risk of climate disasters, and a healthier world for future generations? It seems like divestment is the sweetest Valentine of them all.

Here’s how you can break up with fossil fuels:

  1. Join millions at GoFossilFree.org. Add your name to one (or several) of the 450 different petitions across 60 countries. The more your public institution(s) see that climate change is an issue of concern for the community, the sooner we can start a discussion about the long-term consequences of climate action. If there’s no divestment organization in your community, start your own!
  2. Divest yourself. A recent study done by the Sierra Club and Rainforest Action Network found that major banks and credit card companies, like Wells Fargo, Bank of America, Chase, and Morgan Stanley, give hefty contributions to fossil fuels. If you pay annual fees, transfer fees, or interest to these banks, your funds are supporting coal and oil investment. Consider moving your money to a credit union or a community development bank in your area. To find out how your bank rates, check out Green America’s scorecard.
  3. Learn more and support the movement. Below are a few great resources to help you learn more about divestment and help us build a greener future for all! Learn more about divestment from the following resources:
  • Bill McKibben of 350.org discusses why student-led divestment movements are changing the landscape of fossil fuels. Read more on Rolling Stone.
  • The Financial Case for Divestment of Fossil Fuel Companies by Endowment Fiduciaries by  The Huffington Post.
  • The country of Norway divests from fossil fuels: learn how and why here on Clean Technica.
  • Why the discussion is now Peak Carbon instead of Peak Oil by GoFossilFree.
  • Learn what happened on Global Divestment Day in February 2015: watch the video from GoFossilFree.

Join the community of Climate Heroes: click here to join our newsletter!

Dinosaur image from Go Fossil Free Campaign Solana Beach, divest image from Resilience.org

Rachel GoldbergAbout the Author: Rachel is a recent graduate of the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa, and is the RISE Intern for Oroeco. She is excited to pursue a career in environmental sustainability, and is thrilled to promote Oroeco’s vision of saving money and the planet simultaneously!

Read Full Post »

Electronics-Recycling

Finding a good home for your e-waste can have profound effects on people and the planet.

As summer breezes make way for fall’s bright colors, and students trickle back into classrooms, many will be looking to purchase that new laptop or tablet that nowadays is essential for school, work and pleasure. But how sustainable is your computer? What should you look for when choosing a new one, and where will your old laptop go?

Electronic waste, or e-waste, is one of the fastest growing types of waste globally, growing 8.9% annually according to BCC Research. In 2012 alone, consumers around the world bought over 440 million computers and tablets! Since most of us toss our electronics within their average lifespan of 1-3 years, knowing how to deal with e-waste recycling can make a huge difference in your carbon and waste footprints.

In general, laptop computers use much less energy than desktops, but beneath each sleek design most computers are exactly the same, containing a slew of metals and chemicals like lead, arsenic, and mercury that can leach into soil and water resources, endangering the ecosystems we all depend on.

Computers also contain many precious metals, plastics and glass that, when recycled properly, can greatly reduce greenhouse gas emissions by lessening the demand to manufacture and mine for new materials. Saving your old computer or cellphone from the fate of the landfill can make a huge impact — the EPA states that recycling 1 million computers is equal to the electricity costs of 3,657 homes in the United States! With each household owning an average of 24 electronics, and over 3 million people in the US, each one makes a difference.

So, what is the best way to keep your electronics out of landfills? Extend their lives as long as possible. Use your products until the very end, or, if you need the newest gadget, give your electronics a second life by donating them to someone else. When buying a new product, look for minimal packaging and products designed for easy upgrade and disassembly. Ethicalconsumer.org provides a wonderful guide to compare companies and products, and organizations like the Electronics Take Back Coalition and e-stewards.org have a state-by-state directory of certified recycling companies that promise to recycle and refurbish your e-waste in the US.

Before you make a rush for the latest toy, know where your electronics go and come from. By ensuring the safe disposal of electronics and supporting eco-conscious companies you can help to slash the negative impacts of e-waste! To learn more about the social issues of e-waste check out these documentaries, Exporting Harm: The High Tech Trashing of Asia, and Ghana: Digital Dumping Ground.

Join the community of Climate Heroes: click here to join our newsletter!

Rachel GoldbergAbout the Author: Rachel is a recent graduate of the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa, and is the RISE Intern for Oroeco. She is excited to pursue a career in environmental sustainability, and is thrilled to promote Oroeco’s vision of saving money and the planet simultaneously!

Read Full Post »

Warmer but not wetter: NRDC predicts that a majority of US counties will face moderate to extreme water shortages, due to climate change and increased demand.

Warmer but not always wetter: NRDC predicts that a majority of US counties will face moderate to extreme water shortages by 2050, due to climate change and demand.

‘Water, water everywhere, but not a drop to drink.’ This poetically plagiarized prose precedes an International Energy Agency (IEAreport. As the climate changes, so do our precipitation expectations, and the latest portrait drawn by the IEA makes those words look like a possible future photographic caption. Water demand is expected to double by 2035, according to the IEA. Around half of the projected 66 billion cubic meter increase will be swallowed by coal production. This is equivalent to the residential consumption of everyone in the US for three years. The United Nations estimates that 1.8 billion people will have to deal with severe water scarcity and two-thirds of the population will be living in ‘water-stressed conditions.’

Fortunately there is no guarantee of being stuck out at sea sans both paddles. Water awareness is a good first step, and you can simultaneously cut your carbon and water footprint, since water, agriculture and energy are so intertwined. We’ve mentioned before how becoming a weekday vegetarian can save you around 2 tons of carbon, there are also benefits for your water footprint. The average American diet uses around 1,000 gallons a person everyday. Choosing to eat less meat and dairy and (if you are eating meat) picking grass-fed over grain-fed can make a real difference. National Geographic estimates that a vegan consumes around 600 fewer gallons of water than the average American. Then there’s all the embodied water in the energy you consume and the products you buy, many of which come from water stressed regions of the world. So as you buy less stuff and make your home a model of energy efficiency you’ll also be working water wonders for the people and ecosystems that need it most.

Join the community of Climate Heroes: click here to join our newsletter!

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: