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Archive for the ‘Transportation’ Category

 

A sneak peak at Oroeco's spiffy new Dashboard, which automatically tracks your personal climate impacts, compares you with your friends, and gives you personalized tips for saving carbon and money.

A sneak peak at Oroeco’s spiffy new Dashboard, which automatically tracks your personal climate impacts, compares you with your friends, gives customized tips for saving carbon and money, and rewards you and your friends for taking action.

Earth Day 2014 is upon us! We’re marking the auspicious occasion with the launch of Oroeco BETA, the world’s first service that automatically tracks your impacts on climate change, then rewards you and all your friends for taking actions that lead to a happier, healthier planet. The journey has really just begun. Oroeco’s team, advisors and intrepid beta testers have put in long hours to get us where we are now, but Oroeco is still only scratching the surface of the transformative tool for sustainability we think it can be. We’ll always remain a work-in-progress, as we hope to be adding a LOT more functionality and improving your user experience for many years to come.

Whether or not Oroeco puts a dent in climate change really depends on you. We’re only as powerful as the number of you using us, the amount you decide to take meaningful action, and the friends you encourage to do the same. So go ahead, sign up to take us for a spin; then invite all your friends. If you don’t have one already, you’ll also have to create a (free) Mint.com account to get started, and our About page and FAQ will fill in some details about how and why we’re doing what we’re doing. We’d also love to hear your feedback about what you like, what you don’t, and what we should add next to make Oroeco as awesome as can be!

And if you dig Oroeco BETA, stay-tuned for our first awesome mobile app, launching soon(ish)! OK, we’ll get off our self-promotional soapbox now…

We’ve been a bit delinquent about blogging while diving neck-deep into Oroeco’s web app, but we’ll be reentering the blogosphere soon. We’re planning to delve deep into the nitty gritty scientific details of personal sustainability, but we could use your ideas for what you’d like to see us research and write about. So tell us, what burning climate conundrums keep you up at night? Paper or plastic? Trains, planes or automobiles? Cow-fart collectors? We are at your blogging disposal!

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A sexy green Tesla Roadster won’t save you $, but plenty of other eco autos will.

Need a whiff of new car smell in your life? Wondering how auto options shake out for both your pocketbook and the planet? Well, your tax dollars have funded a handy tool to help you green your wheels. Coming courtesy of EPA and DOE, fueleconomy.gov allows you to compare how different models stack up in terms of operating cost, gasoline consumption, and greenhouse gas emissions.

The site includes electric vehicles and plug-in hybrids, so you can see that an all-electric Nissan Leaf will cost about $600 per year in fuel, compared with ~$1200/yr for a Toyota Prius hybrid, and ~$1,600/yr for a basic Honda Civic (based on average US gas prices and 15,000 miles per year, which you can personalize). Greenhouse gas emissions are a bit trickier to compare for electric vs. gasoline guzzlers, since there’s wide state by state variation in carbon emission intensity for electricity. So a Leaf may be neon green in Seattle (which gets most of its power from hydro and other renewables), but turn a much muddier color when driven in West Virginia (which still relies almost exclusively on coal to make electrons flow).

Don’t want to drop bling on a new ride? Fueleconomy.gov includes used cars too, so you can see how your old pickup performs alongside that sweet vintage Mustang on craigslist. Or, if you’re happy with what you’ve got, you can also check out tips for improving gas mileage (and saving money), like driving more efficiently and keeping your tires inflated (which can save $0.10 per gallon).

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A few tips to ensure our world doesn’t come to an end this year.

We’re not really the gloom and doom types, so despite what some apocalypse-happy interpreters of the Maya calendar may say, we’re pretty sure our wonderful world didn’t come to an end in 2012. More likely this 3rd rock from the Sun is sticking around for at least the next 7 billion years, all the more reason to make it a more pleasant place to reside. Resolutions in 2013? We’ve got too many, but (keeping in theme) here are 13 to kick off the new year and round out a baker’s dozen. Unless noted otherwise, numbers below are based on calculations from UC Berkeley.

1) Eat What You Buy, Buy Only What You’ll Eat (or Compost)

The average American family throws away $2,100 worth of (what was once) perfectly delicious food each year, according to NRDC. All that wasted food annually sums to a tremendous amount of wasted resources: 25% of all freshwater, 4% of US oil consumption, $90 billion in economic losses, and 31 million tons of landfill waste (which releases the potent greenhouse gas methane as it degrades). If that moldy can of cranberry sauce has truly transcended the bounds of edibility, toss it in the compost bin instead of the trash (which won’t revive the wasted resources, but will significantly reduce methane emissions).

2) Become a “Weekday Vegetarian”

We’ve written before about how meat makes up the largest part of food’s footprint for most of us. So the less (red) meat (and dairy) you eat, the better your dinner looks for the planet. If you don’t already have vegan tendencies, start with meatless Mondays and work your way up to become a weekday vegetarian, which allows you to eat as omnivorously as you please over the weekend. Besides cutting support for inhumane factory farms, weekday vegetarianism should save you over $1,000 and ~2 tons of CO2 per year.

3) Live Close to Work (&/or Telecommute)

The closer you live to your place of employment the better it is for all of us: you waste less time commuting, save energy, save money, and contribute less to congestion. So live within walking or biking distance of the office, if possible, or scheme up ways to telecommute. If you can’t cut out your fuel-fueled commute entirely, carpooling and public transportation are the next best things. Here are some tips to help you calculate how your options stack up.

4) Bike for Buns of Steel (& a Better Tomorrow)

That’s right, biking is not only the greenest way to roll around town, it’s also great for your gluteus maximus (and pretty much all your other parts, assuming you can avoid agro taxis, rail ruts, and car doors). Who knows, pushing pedals may even inspire you to become the next Danny MacAskill. If not, you’ll at least look less ridiculous than these guys.

5) Take the Pedal Off the Metal

When you do have to drive, try to resist the hot inner Indycar driver. Cutting down on speeding, excess cargo weight, sudden acceleration and deceleration will save both gas money and break pads (and perhaps your life as well). Just reducing highway cruising speeds from 75 to 65 MPH will save the average driver about $500 and 2 tons of CO2 per year. Properly inflating tires and changing air filters can lop off an additional annual savings of $200 and 0.75 tons of CO2.

6) Cash-in That Clunker (for a Fuel-Sipper)

Upgrading from a car that gets 20 MPG to 35 MPG will save the average driver about $750 and nearly 3 tons of CO2 per year. Really want to blow your neighbors’ minds in a cacophony of cognitive dissonance? Try an electric Hummer HX-T. Euro pop techno music apparently comes standard!

7) Cool Water + Warm Sun = Lasting Laundry

Your clothes really don’t need hot (or even warm) water to clean, thanks to the miracles of modern laundry detergent chemistry (including the best biodegradable brands). That’s good, since washing hot means 90% of the energy in a load of laundry goes to heating water. Then there’s the dryer, another major energy hog. Line drying (either outside, or indoors on a rack) saves not only energy and emissions, it also extends the life of your clothing, avoiding up to $70,000 over 30 years (if you believe estimates from The Daily Green).

8) Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

It’s cliche to say, but the less stuff you buy the less of a footprint you leave behind. When you do buy, try to buy reused (Goodwill and Craigslist being great places to start). If you’re not motivated by things like climate change, resource scarcity, and habitat loss for cuddly critters, consider the human cost of making cheap stuff via the Slavery Footprint calculator. Recycling is great too, though many products can only be recycled into lower value materials, so even better to have less to recycle to begin with.

9) Slay Your Energy Vampires

We’ve already warned you that your DVR and satellite/cable box may be sucking more energy than any other appliance in your home (refrigerator included!), even when you think they’re switched off. You may also have plenty of other appliances out there sucking electrons in stand-by mode, adding up to hundreds of dollars of wasted energy. The only real way to stop the energy vampires is by putting everything you can on switchable power strips, which you turn off whenever you’re not putting gizmos to use. There are now even smart strips that cut phantom power to other plugged-in electronics once a controlling device (like a TV or computer) is turned off.

10) Don’t Procrastinate, Insulate (& Go Solar!)

A well-insulated home is a happy home, since over half of home energy use leaks out the cracks. If you really want to upgrade your crib into the green stratosphere, ask your utility about buying green power or put some solar panels on your roof. With prices below $1 per watt, solar PV has never been cheaper, and you can virtually eliminate your home’s carbon footprint with the right set-up. Group buying services like 1BOG can help you get the best deals out there.

11) Put Your Money Where Your Heart Is

If you’re a lucky ducky with a nest egg to hatch, make sure it’s incubating in companies you believe in. We’ve compiled a few tips to help you green your 401(k) portfolio. Give ’em a gander (or a goose, if you prefer).

12) Take a “Staycation”

The more scientists look at aviation impacts, the less friendly flying looks for the planet. It’s not just CO2 emissions from jet engines that are a problem; high altitude NOx, soot and water vapor also directly contribute to global warming, potentially doubling to quadrupling the impacts from CO2 alone. So a roundtrip flight across the US is at least akin to driving a 15 MPG Chevy Suburban all by your lonesome, or worse. Perhaps a staycation is in order instead? Just kick back, relax, catch up on your blog reading, and enjoy the fruits of your post(poned)-apocalyptic resolutions!

13) Kill Your Catalogs

Each year about 19 billion catalogs are mailed in the US, chopping down 53 million trees and guzzeling 56 billion gallons of wastewater to produce piles of paper that mostly go straight to a recycling bin. Go to catalogchoice.org to stop the madness in your mailbox.

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